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Diane Rehm to Receive National Humanities Medal from President Obama

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Diane Rehm, host of WAMU 88.5’s and NPR’s The Diane Rehm Show, has been named a recipient of the 2013 National Humanities Medal, to be presented by President Barack Obama at the White House on July 28, 2014.

The National Humanities Medal honors individuals or groups whose work has deepened the nation’s understanding of the humanities, broadened our citizens’ engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans’ access to important resources in the humanities. Recipients are selected by the President of the United States in conjunction with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

“It is a great privilege to be among those selected to receive the National Humanities Medal. To receive this award from President Obama and the National Endowment for the Humanities—and to be in the company of recipients who have inspired us through work that captures the human spirit—is an incredible honor,” Rehm said.

“For nearly 35 years, Diane Rehm has brought thoughtful conversations to millions of public radio listeners worldwide, and her careful and curious exploration of literature, the arts and the broader humanities has long been one of her distinguishing qualities,” said WAMU 88.5 Programming Director Mark McDonald. “We congratulate Diane on this esteemed and richly deserved recognition conferred upon her by President Obama and the National Endowment for the Humanities.”

Diane Rehm is a native Washingtonian who began her radio career in 1973 as a volunteer for WAMU 88.5. In 1979, she was selected to host WAMU 88.5’s local morning talk show, Kaleidoscope, which was renamed The Diane Rehm Show in 1984. The program has grown from a local morning talk show to a public broadcasting powerhouse, and is distributed by NPR, NPR Worldwide and SIRIUS XM to nearly 2.6 million listeners weekly. In 2010, Rehm was awarded a Personal Peabody Award after more than 30 years in public broadcasting.

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