WAMU 88.5 : About

Filed Under:

88.3 Ocean City: Assistance for individuals with disabilities in Delaware

Play associated audio

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 12 percent of Americans are living with a disability*. The Arc of Delaware is a nonprofit organization serving more than 25,000 individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities through advocacy and direct service.

The Arc of Delaware's case advocates work closely with individuals with disabilities and their families to connect them to services that apply to their circumstances. Through the Housing Information Center, the organization helps find safe affordable homes as well as job placement assistance. The Parent Mentoring Program helps parents secure appropriate educational services for their children. Case advocates provide crisis intervention, counseling, money management programs, and drop-in support groups. The organization’s Delaware People First program provides a forum for self-advocating adults with disabilities to learn about policies and developments pertaining to disability.

For more information, contact:
The Arc of Delaware
2 South Augustine Street, Suite B
Wilmington, DE 19804
302.996.9400

*United States Census Bureau, 2011

NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

These Old-Timey Philly Candies Offer A Taste Of Politics Past

Clear toy candies are a centuries-old local tradition. With the Democratic convention in town, an old-school candy maker is peddling some with a political bent. Think lollipop meets Mount Rushmore.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.