WAMU 88.5 News reporter wins top prize for in-depth reporting on childhood obesity | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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WAMU 88.5 News reporter wins top prize for in-depth reporting on childhood obesity

WAMU 88.5 today announced that education reporter Kavitha Cardoza has won first place in the Series category in the National Awards for Education Reporting, presented by the Education Writers Association (EWA).

Cardoza received the award for her five-part series titled “The Heavy Burden of Childhood Obesity,” which originally aired in April 2011. The series explored the growing trend of childhood obesity through the stories of area families, researchers, educators, and physicians working to address the health crisis. Cardoza reported the series with producer Ginger Moored and news editor Rebecca Blatt.

The Education Writers Association presents the awards in recognition of excellence in education beat reporting in print, radio, television, and online media. The award will be presented at the organization’s national banquet in Philadelphia, Pa., in May.

Audio of “The Heavy Burden of Childhood Obesity” is available online.

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