WAMU 88.5 : Support

Year End Giving Suggestions

  • If you've received a mail request from us recently, please make out your check or include your credit card information and return it. All contributions by mail postmarked on or before December 31 are eligible for tax deduction.
  • Make your contribution online.
  • Make a year-end gift of stock, or use stock to fulfill your pledge. Visit our planned giving website, or have your broker contact membership@wamu.org for transfer instructions.
  • If you're a service member or civilian federal employee, designate a contribution to WAMU through your local Combined Federal Campaign. To find our agency code for your campaign, visit our CFC web page.
  • Make a vehicle donation to WAMU by calling toll-free, (866) WAMU-444, or find more information and donate online.
  • Call us at (800) 248-8850 at any time, and we'll take your information over the telephone.
  • Leave us a legacy of support for the future by naming WAMU in your will, life insurance policy, pension/IRA plan, or by other means in your estate planning. You or your advisor may visit our planned giving pages or contact us at (202) 885-1253 for more information. We promise to be discrete.
  • Make it a surprise gift and mail it at your convenience. Our address is WAMU, 4401 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20008
NPR

Hey, Kids, Remember You're On Our Side: The FBI Makes A Movie

Instead of a public service announcement, the FBI has made Game of Pawns, a docudrama about a college student recruited by the Chinese government. The message is obvious: Don't be a spy.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.