WAMU 88.5 : Support

Gifts of Stock/Appreciated Property

Appreciated assets, such as stocks or mutual funds that have been held longer than one year and have appreciated in value, may be donated to WAMU 88.5 and may provide you with tax savings.

When you give appreciated assets, you avoid paying capital-gains tax on the increased value of your stock. You may also be entitled to a charitable deduction based on the stock's current value. Contributing stock is a great way to enjoy membership in WAMU 88.5 with associated benefits. A gift of $1,200 qualifies you for membership in WAMU's Leadership Circle.

When considering gifts of stock, we recommend you consult with your financial adviser.

How to donate stock to WAMU 88.5

When providing instructions to your broker, please be sure to have the stock transfer clearly designate the donation to WAMU 88.5. Our legal name is American University (WAMU). Your broker will need the following information:

  • DTC# 0015
  • Account # 504024436, for the benefit of American University (credited to WAMU 88.5)
  • Morgan Stanley, 1850 K St. NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20006
  • Broker: David A. Stuart, (202) 861-5028 or david.a.stuart@morganstanley.com
  • Alternate contact: Carrie Philips, 202-861-5092 or carrie.philips@morganstanley.com

If you are transferring a mutual fund asset, please contact WAMU 88.5 before initiating that transaction.  Mutual funds require special handling.

It is important to notify WAMU 88.5 when you have completed your request to your broker. Please alert WAMU directly of your pending stock donation (including the company and number of shares) so that we can credit your gift in a timely and accurate manner. To ensure proper gift identification, please call Eliza Saunders at 202-885-8904 or send an email to esaunders@wamu.org.

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