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Arlington Cemetery's Grave Sites Now Searchable Online

The gravesites at Arlington Cemetery are a little more manageable now that they are archived in a searchable database.
Jonathan Wilson
The gravesites at Arlington Cemetery are a little more manageable now that they are archived in a searchable database.

Arlington National Cemetery, which has come under intense criticism in recent years because of unmarked graves, misplaced records and mishandling of some veterans' cremated remains, today launched an online database (and apps) that it hopes will allow "family members and the public to find gravesites and explore Arlington's rich history."

The desktop version is here. Apps are available for:

-- Apple products

-- Android devices

-- BlackBerrys

According to the cemetery:

 

"The Army photographed 259,978 gravesites, niches and markers using a custom-built smart phone application and instituted a rigorous process to review each headstone photo with existing cemetery records and other historical documents. The end result was the creation of a single, verifiable and authoritative database of all those laid to rest at Arlington that is linked to the Arlington's digital mapping system."

The database will be updated going forward.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
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