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Track Work On Orange, Red Through Columbus Day

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Metro is telling riders to expect extra travel times through Columbus Day.
Scott Pitocco: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lightsoutphotos/4331800230/
Metro is telling riders to expect extra travel times through Columbus Day.

Metro is planning to use the Columbus Day holiday Monday for an extra day of weekend track maintenance.

The work gets underway at 10 p.m. Friday night and will affect service on the Red and Orange lines.

Red Line trains will share a single track all weekend between Judiciary Square and Fort Totten. Metro says anyone headed through that stretch can expect it to take up to 20 minutes longer than usual. Red Line passengers on the western leg and through downtown can expect 10 minute delays.

Meanwhile, Orange Line trains will be single tracking between Stadium-Armory and Cheverly. Metro says anyone traveling to or from stations east of Stadium-Armory should figure on 15 minutes of additional travel time.

The work will continue through Columbus Day on Monday. Service should return to normal on Tuesday morning.

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