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Hundreds To Participate In Renewal & Remembrance Day

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Rows of headstones at Arlington National Cemetery.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jasonpier/3548882108/
Rows of headstones at Arlington National Cemetery.

More than 400 people from 30 states are expected to roll up their sleeves and get to work for the 16th annual Renewal & Remembrance Day at Arlington National Cemetery Monday.

They'll be tackling several projects, including an upgrade to the cemetery's irrigation system. Event chairman Walter Wray, a landscape contractor from Bethesda, says the upgrades reflect a change in philosophy about irrigation.

It's a move away from sprinklers broadcasting water over wide swaths of land toward a more targeted approach.

"We're adding a lot of different heads and emitters in places where they used to count on one large rotor to cover a large area," he says.

All of the materials and labor will be donated. Wray says it's a way for landscapers to recognize those who have made the ultimate sacrifice.

"It's just a great way to give back to our country, and to improve the landscape of some of our most cherished and hallowed grounds here."

The event begins at 7:30 am.

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