Leave it to a British comedian and a singing troupe of kids to explain why D.C. isn't a state — and why they think that it should be.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Warn Of High Energy Costs With Obama's 'Clean Power Plan'

Republican leaders in Virginia say Obama's clean energy plan would drive up energy costs and damage a struggling economy. Democrats say saving the planet is more important than the short-term problem of higher energy bills.
WAMU 88.5

Will Banning Spotters Curb Predatory Towing? Probably Not, Officials Say

Montgomery County lawmakers have officially banned the use of spotters by tow companies, but officials with the county's consumer protection office say they don't expect it to fix predatory towing.

WAMU 88.5

Farms, Coasts And Air Conditioning: What Climate Change Means For Virginia

Climate change presents obstacles for just about everywhere in the United States — but rising temperatures are expected to be felt keenly in a number of Virginia's important economic areas.

WAMU 88.5

In His Memoir, A Cocaine Kingpin's Son Sheds Light On D.C.'s Crack Era

Tony Lewis Jr. is the son of Tony Lewis Sr., a former cocaine kingpin in D.C. who's been in prison since 1989. In Lewis Jr.'s new memoir, "Slugg: A Boy's Life in the Age of Mass Incarceration," he shares stories and lessons from his upbringing during D.C.'s crack epidemic.
WAMU 88.5

Silver Line Ridership In Tysons Well Below Metro Estimates

The number of riders using the new Silver Line has underwhelmed so far, but things like a lack of pedestrian and biking infrastructure connecting to the stations may be holding the line back, according to an internal Metro study.

WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Put Off Meeting With Governor Over New Congressional Map

Virginia's congressional map has twice been ruled unconstitutional, but state Republicans have so far put off meeting with the state's Democratic governor to redraw the boundaries.

WAMU 88.5

How To Fund A Transit Project: A Purple Line Explainer

Key decisions are coming that will determine whether the 16-mile Purple Line light rail project between Bethesda and New Carrollton is built next year. Not surprisingly, many of them revolve around money.
WAMU 88.5

Pilot Program Makes Inmates Eligible For Education Grants

In hopes of reducing recidivism, the Obama administration is announcing a pilot program that will allow incarcerated students the ability to receive federal Pell grants for college courses.
WAMU 88.5

The LGBT Swim Team That Fought For Equality — And Better Pools

As society becomes more accepting of the LGBT community, is there still a place for a team created for gay and lesbian swimmers?
NPR

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

Foraging bumblebees can pick up nearly half their weight in pollen before heading home to the hive, research shows. All that weight tucked into hollows on their hind legs can complicate flying.
NPR

California Wildfire Blazes Through 60,000 Acres, Containment Estimated Next Week

Cal Fire says almost 3,000 firefighters — using four airtanker planes, 19 helicopters and 285 fire engines — have been "working aggressively to build control lines."
NPR

Obama's Climate Plan Faces Huge Political Challenges

Even before he officially unveiled it, President Obama's plan to cut the carbon pollution produced by power plants faced significant opposition.
NPR

Oil Prices Tumble Again, Hurting Drillers But Helping Drivers

Oil prices are falling, down sharply since mid-June to just over $45 a barrel. That has affected gasoline prices, now down to an average of $2.65 a gallon, about 85 cents less than a year ago.
NPR

Second American Accused In Illegal Killing Of Lion In Zimbabwe

Zimbabwean wildlife officials say the man killed the lion in April during a hunt that was illegal. This comes a week after the killing of a lion named Cecil sparked a worldwide outcry.
NPR

Ultimate Frisbee Recognized By Olympic Committee

The official recognition by the International Olympic Committee means that disc sports are now eligible for future Olympic Games.
NPR

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the past few years, there has been a shift. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.