WAMU Emergency Resource Guide | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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WAMU Emergency Resource Guide

The Federal Emergency Management Agency recommends you check your emergency supplies and fuel your car. Remember that cordless phones depend on electricity to function; if you have a land line be sure to have a CORDED phone in your home. If not, charge up your mobile phone early and often so it is charged in the event the power goes out. Stock up on batteries, bottled water and be sure to have a battery-operated radio. Turn your refrigerator and freezer to coldest settings. Please be sure to print out the emergency contact page for your area for easy reference.

Important Information:

 

Utility Contact Information:

  • Dominion Virginia Power 1-888-366-4357
  • Washington Gas: (800) 752-7520
  • Pepco: 1-877-Pepco-62
  • Comcast: 800-COMCAST
  • Verizon: (800) 275-2355
  • Allegheny Power: 1-800-255-3443
  • Baltimore Gas & Electric: 1-877-778-2222
  • Delmarva Power: 1-800-898-8045
  • Eastern Shore Natural Gas: (410) 524-7060

 

County Emergency Management Contacts:

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